Ruminations of a Taco-Obsessed Philly Native

Bitcoin became a hot investment in 2017 and many analysts told people to get in on it as it took off. One investor, Paul Mampilly the author of the “Profits Unlimited” newsletter has other thoughts. Mampilly has been investing in stocks for many years without even going through a wealth manager, and now he’s instructing middle class people who are generally new to investing on how they can start their own portfolio and buy inexpensive stocks. Mampilly has been paying particular attention to Internet of Things stocks, and he did say that he would have recommended buying Bitcoin stocks early in 2017 prior to its surge, but he has a reason for avoiding it right now. The reason is because its price has gone much higher than it should due to demand that shouldn’t be as high as it is, and as a result it’s formed a bubble just like the dot-com industry did in the late 1990s. While Mampilly doesn’t recommend Bitcoin, he does say there are other stocks to look at.

Paul Mampilly spent many years in professional financial advisory services with big banks and alternative investment firms, and he earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting and finance from Montclair State University and an MBA from Fordham. He entered investment banking as a young assistant in the research department of Deutsche Bank, and his acumen move him up the ladder quickly to fund management positions, and he continued in high management positions when he joined ING and Banker’s Trust. Mampilly took a brief hiatus from banking in 2003 when he did consulting for a boutique firm, but he returned to Wall Street in 2006 when he became a director at Kinetics International Fund, the most prominent new hedge fund declared by Barron’s. Many new investors came to Kinetics International when word spread that the firm was managing as much as 40% annual returns, and their AUM grew from $6 billion to $25 billion in just a year. To see more, visit here.

Paul Mampilly had a lot of accomplishments on Wall Street including winning the investment competition at the Templeton Foundation in which he succeeded while the markets were down in 2008. But he became much happier when he left that life behind because he now had more time to spend with his family, and he could share financial insights with people who genuinely needed them. Mampilly’s newsletters were taken with skepticism at first, but as people started taking his advice they saw that it truly did work, and thus far hundreds of thousands have subscribed to his newsletters.

Paul Mampilly @